Tonkatsu Sauce

Tonkatsu Sauce とんかつソース

There is a lot to be said for living in Cape Town, most of which is unequivocally positive; the setting is stunning, the weather is perfect and the people are lovely. However, when it comes to sourcing Asian products, it can be described as trying at the best of times.

Tonkatsu SauceDon’t get me wrong, things have improved dramatically in the last decade, but inconsistency is still the bane of the local Asian food market. Items that were readily available one year, are suddenly nonexistent the next – it can be very frustrating to say the least! Japanese goods, in particular, seem to fall victim to this fickle approach to supply; making it hard to replenish an ever diminishing pantry.

So what do you do when you’ve finish your last bottle of store-bought Tonkatsu Sauce? If you’re me, you’d try to make your own of course! Now I would never bother making my own Tonkatsu Sauce if it was readily available to buy, but it isn’t, so I have to improvise. This recipe isn’t quite perfect, but it is a very passable approximation. If you can, however, source it locally, stop reading this recipe immediately. Go buy a bottle and count yourself lucky!

Note: Tonkatsu Sauce is a Japanese condiment that is traditionally served with Tonkatsu (Crumbed Pork Cutlet) or Chicken Katsu (Crumbed Chicken) with steamed rice and salad. It can also be used as a substitute for Okonomi Sauce for Okonomiyaki, if unavailable.

For more Japanese recipes, please click HERE or to find out more about how to stock a Japanese Pantry, please click HERE

Click here for the recipe

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Tonkatsu トンカツ (Crumbed Pork Cutlet)

Tonkatsu トンカツ (Crumbed Pork Cutlet)It may surprise many to learn that not all Japanese food is healthy and Tonkatsu is a case in point. What is effectively a crumbed, deep-fried pork cutlet, tonkatsu is actually one of Japan’s favourite dishes.

A hallmark of youshoku cuisine (Japanese-style Western cuisine), tonkatsu is a very Japanese take on a Western schnitzel. In fact, other than the use of panko breadcrumbs, there is very little difference between the two! However, what really sets tonkatsu apart from its Western counterpart is how it is served. There are 3 traditional ways to enjoy tonkatsu (although there are, of course, other ways too). It can be served with just rice, shredded cabbage, mustard and tonkatsu sauce, it can be added to Japanese Curry Sauce to make katsu-karē or it can be used as a donburi topping called Katsudon. My personal favourite, katsudon is the epitome of Japanese comfort food, but no matter how you choose to eat it, tonkatsu is always delicious!

For more Japanese recipes, please click HERE or to find out more about how to stock a Japanese Pantry, please click HERE

Click here for the recipe