The Basics

Miso Butter

Broccoli with Red Pepper and Miso Butter

Broccoli with Red Pepper and Miso Butter

Okay, so I have confession. I can hide it no longer: I’m a closet Banting/LCHF dieter.

At least I’m trying to be.

Admittedly, I’m not yet a complete high-fat convert – I’m sorry, but butter in tea?!? Seriously, I’m not a Tibetian yak herder; so thanks, but no thanks. I have, however, taken to a reduced carb diet and have developed a new obsession as a result of an increased fat intake – miso butter!

Simple and insanely tasty, miso butter is a must-have staple in everybody’s freezer – whether you subscribe to Banting or not. Quick to make, the miso butter ‘log’ can sit in your freezer almost indefinitely. Not that it will last that long as you will probably end up eating it with everything!

Great on grilled steaks, vegetables, grilled chicken and burgers – miso butter will perk up virtually any meal.

Click here for the recipe

Duck Fat Roast Potatoes

Roast PotatoesLife’s too short to suffer bad roast potatoes, but thankfully I wouldn’t know because mine are pretty awesome!

A tad conceited perhaps, but my roast potatoes almost never fail to come out golden, delicious and with that all important “crunch”!

Unfortunately, there isn’t a lone “trick” to making the perfect roast potato, but rather a series of simple, yet essential, steps that yield the desired result. Parboiling the potatoes in heavily salted water is a vitally important part of the recipe, so don’t be tempted to skip it.

Arguably the most important factor in making your roast potatoes is, however, the fat you chose to cook them in. There are a variety of options out there, but I prefer using duck fat. Healthy and relatively easy to source, duck fat makes for great results!

Click here for the recipe

Sichuan Chilli Oil 四川辣油

Sichuan Chilli Oil (makes 250ml)

  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 spring onion, cut into segments
  • 2 slices of ginger
  • 2 cloves of garlic, lightly crushed
  • 2 star anise pods
  • 1 small cinnamon stick, approximately 3cm long
  • 4 tbsp. Sichuan peppercorns, lightly toasted and crushed
  • 3 tbsp. chilli flakes (preferably Sichuan or Korean)
  • 1/8 tsp. ground coriander
  • 1/8 tsp. ground cumin

Method:

  1. Combine vegetable oil, spring onion, ginger, garlic, star anise, cinnamon and Sichuan peppercorn in a small sauce pot
  2. On a medium heat, let the ingredients fry in the oil for a couple of minutes, or until the garlic and spring onion just start to colour
  3. Add the chilli flakes, ground coriander and cumin
  4. Fry for another minute until the chilli flakes slightly darken in colour
  5. Turn off the heat and set it aside
  6. Pick out the spring onion, ginger, garlic, cinnamon and star anise

The chilli oil will last indefinitely; the longer it sits, the better the flavour

For more Chinese recipes, please click HERE or to find out more about how to stock a Chinese Pantry, please click HERE

Couscous (Plain and Cinnamon)

Plain CouscousCooking the perfect couscous may seem easy and generally it is, but it is also very easy for it to go very wrong. I should know, I’ve had enough couscous catastrophes to last me a lifetime; too wet, too dry, too clumpy – if there is a couscous calamity out there, I’ve suffered it!

In spite of my failings over the years, I’ve persevered with my mediocre attempts until I finally figured out the key to good couscous: olive oil…and your index finger. Sounds a bit strange? It’s really not. In fact, the key to my couscous conundrum is surprisingly simple – the trick is to lightly oil the grains before adding the boiling water. This simple act will produce clump free, fluffy couscous every time. I’ve been following this simple method for years now and I’ve been enjoying the perfect couscous ever since – now so can you.

For more delicious Moroccan recipes please click here, or if you would like to read on about Moroccan food, please click here

Click here for the recipe